UGLY by nature cucumber water

 

Cucumber water has been shown to help reduce high blood pressure — a major risk factor for heart disease — by helping the kidneys to get rid of extra sodium in the body.

Cucumbers are incredibly rich in vitamin K, which helps to form the bones matrix and keeps the bone dense and strong.

Dehydration can cause digestive problems, make circulation more sluggish and even promote weight gain, since many people eat when they actually are thirsty. The National Institute of Health, however, recommends between 6 and 8 glasses a day for best health: cucumber water, being delicious, makes getting enough water in your system a lot easier to do.

It is rich in antioxidants and compounds such as cucurbitacins and lignans which have been shown in clinical studies to help the body fend off cancer development. 
Cucumbers, however, are a rich source nutrients like vitamins A and C and manganese to make up for deficiencies in our diet.

Cucumber water can help detoxify our bodies due to its high water and high fiber content, which make it easier for the body to eliminate harmful chemicals every time we go to the bathroom.

Sun exposure, cold or hot weather and air pollution can all take its toll on your skin, leaving it dry, red and itchy. However, cucumber water can help. When you drink it, you help to not only hydrate your skin from within, you also provide silicon and vitamin B-5, two nutrients your skin needs to stay healthy. When you use it as a toner, you can help reduce inflammation and irritation and keep your skin smooth and clear. 
Source:  lifehack

Potassium in fruit bananas

A new study from St. George's Medical School in London, published in the April 2005 issue of Hypertension, compared the blood-pressure-lowering effects of potassium chloride against the effects of potassium citrate. The results of this study showed that potassium citrate has the same blood-pressure-lowering effect as potassium chloride, which has been proven in the past to lower blood pressure. Potassium chloride, however, must be taken as a dietary supplement, whereas potassium citrate is found naturally in many foods.

The study tested the effects of potassium chloride and potassium citrate on 14 adults with an average starting blood pressure of 151/93, placing them in the category of Stage 1 hypertension. The volunteers were randomly split into two groups; one group was given potassium chloride daily for one week, while the other received potassium citrate. Then, following a one week break, the treatment groups were crossed over and received the opposite treatment for an additional week. While taking potassium chloride, volunteers had an average blood pressure of 140/88, and while on potassium citrate, it averaged at 138/88. The difference between the effects of the two types of potassium was not significant, meaning each had similarly beneficial effects on hypertension. "These results support other evidence for an increase in potassium intake and indicate that potassium does not need to be given in the form of chloride to lower blood pressure," write the researchers in their report. "Increasing the consumption of food high in #potassium is likely to have the same effect on #bloodpressure as potassium chloride." Rather than investing in a new dietary supplement, lowering your blood pressure may be as easy as watching what you eat.

Source:health.harvard

google2eafce2b5e52af67.html